SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18TH, 2018

The Paly Fiery Arts Program will hold its fifth ever Glass Weekend Workshop on Nov. 10-11, open to all students, parents and community members.

According to Fiery Arts Instructional Supervisor Martin Ehrensvard, Glass Weekend Workshops are designed for people who are curious to learn about the art of glassblowing, since most people do not see glassblowing facilities in Palo Alto on a frequent basis.

“Me and the other instructors will guide you through the process.Not only do you get to learn how to blow glass, you will also get to make nice things out of glass and take them home.”

Supervisor Martin Ehrensvard

Ehrensvard said participants of the standard workshop usually make a couple of flowers, paperweight, cups, a base and a bowl. The workshop also offers other options.

“If you’re interested in doing something else more specific, we can help you with that instead,” Ehrensvard said. “If you have taken a first workshop, you can always come back and take a second workshop and do whatever you want. We want people who come in to make most of the glass themselves, but we can also help them if they are not comfortable to do certain things.”

According to senior Phoebe Crabb, who participated in her third workshop in October, the workshops are intense sessions running from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“They’re so open to whatever you want to make, and there is just no limit to what you can do.I saw a [glass] oyster with a pearl in it. There was also a woman who made two sculptures of Donald Trump as a political art piece. One is supposed to be on display, and she is supposed to smash [the other one]. The great thing about the workshop is that if you have an idea, it can help you deliver the message.”

Senior Phoebe Crabb

Crabb said one of the other advantages of Paly’s glassblowing workshops is that the facility is better equipped and provides many vibrant, aesthetic colors that are not offered elsewhere nearby.

The Glass Weekend Workshop also provide financial support to the Paly Fiery Arts Program, which requires a relatively large budget.

“The [student] glassblowers use the studio all the time,” Paly arts teacher Kate Mckenzie said. “The budget is huge, so they have to support that. The kilns [that glass blowers use] are outrageously expensive, as well as the chemicals to blow glass.”

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Byron Zhang
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