Photo by Albert Jung

Students, staff anticipating more inclusive Spirit Week

Due to past instances of disrespectful behavior at spirit rallies, ASB plans to enact stricter rules and introduce new activities during Spirit Week, which occurs Sept. 26 through Sept. 30. 

“This year, we’re having a lot of talk about ground rules,” Spirit Commissioner and senior Evie Kramer said. “If we catch you with an egg in your hand at (a) rally, your entire class will be eliminated. That’s an example, and I’m not saying that’s what’s (going to) happen, but I think we do need to deal with that (kind of behavior).”

Kramer said ASB and administration are also looking to prevent egg wars after juniors threw eggs during last year’s spirit rally.

“It is super awful for the community and not something we wants to be attached to at all,” Kramer said. “And especially not at our rallies — that was super inappropriate.”

Junior Jonathan Liu said he also wants tighter restrictions and ground rules after seeing the aftermath and reactions to last year’s egg wars.

“I remember last year, when I was walking my dog around Hoover park (after Spirit Week), there were so many eggshells just lying everywhere,” Liu said. “I noticed a lot of other people, especially adults with just younger kids, were dissatisfied.”

While ASB plans to keep the classic rally games, Kramer said they are also looking to introduce new concepts.

“We’re trying to keep some of the traditional (games) like tug of war,” Kramer said. “We’re really pushing for an indoor rally. But we haven’t gotten admin approval because of safety concerns, so we can’t promise it.”

Kramer also said she hopes to include the entire student body in spirit week activities by not limiting participation to rallies.

“We’re looking to have a mural or some sort of collaborative art — a quieter type of activity that people can bond in,” Kramer said.

Although Spirit Week is a month earlier due to less sunlight later in the year, Sophomore Class President Julian Hong said his class is determined to win this year.

“This year, we have brought in a lot of outside help,” Hong said. “We have artists and people from robotics (who) are helping. I would say we’re probably the most prepared class right now.”

But Liu said preparing for Spirit Week in a limited amount of time is stressful, especially with specific themes.

“(ASB) was expecting a lot from us when (we) don’t really have a lot of the supplies in order to make these extravagant costumes,” Liu said. “They could have been more broad so more people could participate.”

However, Kramer said the finalized themes are based on democratic voting.

“If people felt that strongly about it, they should have voted that way,” Kramer said. “There was a survey put out so people could have voted.”

Regardless, Liu said he enjoys spending time with his peers during Spirit Week.

“I honestly think the best part about Spirit Week is the amount of camaraderie you have,” Liu said. “And just hanging out with your friends; it feels like you belong in the school.”

Kramer said she hopes this year’s Spirit Week will be more inclusive to ensure everyone has fun and wants to participate.

“I know going to a big rally isn’t everybody’s cup of tea,” Kramer said. “But it’s only fun if you participate and get out what you put in.”